ragtime_xmas_treetruck

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What I love about a rag quilt is how soft and warm they are. The components to a warm, fuzzy rag quilt are flannel and batting; which are sandwiched together and then tacked in place with an X. 

For this quilt, I simply took one 9” square and sewed it to 71 other squares (I left the seam edge at about .75”). The finished quilt is sized at 61” x 67”. 

The best and worst part about this quilt are the edges — they’re left raw. Raw edges work well because it hides the small imperfections, it frays well and stops fraying at the cut point, and it makes the quilt soft. Which means you can forget about the binding of the quilt. And, the reason why the raw edges of a rag quilt are the worst part, is because they need to be cut every .75” to fray right. Since the material is flannel, and you are cutting two to four layers at a time, it can really wear your hands down. A solution to this pain is a really good pair of sharp, small scissors. 

 

ragtime_back_xmas

 

ragtime_sky_xmas

 

ragtime_half

 

ragtime_xmas_folded

 

There are other ways to make a rag quilt. For example, the ragtime quilt I made in the winter of 2004 which had four small blocks next to one large block.

Here are a few (of my favorite) other variations of the rag quilt:

TEXAS Flag Rag Quilt
Orange Peel Quilt (Rag Quilt)
Puff Quilt Pattern
Ragtime Quilt
The Giving Challenge Baby Blanket

 

Lately, it’s been cold and raining here in Tucson, so I’m planning on finding someone in need to give this quilt to. Now that I think about it, there’s a man at a coffee shop where I visit that could use this… Hummm that might perfect.

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Oh,I almost forgot! **A tip for you**

 After the holidays are over, you can find Flannel Sheet sets on sale. This is a great way to get a lot of flannel at a low price.